10 days of hut-to-hut hiking to celebrate 10 years of UNESCO Dolomites

>> Itinerary for experienced hikers only

 >> To do this itinerary or for easier or shorter itineraries, refer to our local mountain guides

DAY 1     

From Cortina town center to Rifugio Palmieri- 3 hours

From Cortina, go to Campo and follow trail 432 to Malga Federa and then to Rifugio Palmieri. Night at Rifugio Palmieri. 

Easy first day through amazing landscapes (Croda da Lago, Becco di Mezzodì, Lastoi de Formin, lake Federa). The area at the foot of the Lastoi de Formin is where the first evidence of the presence of dinosaurs in the Dolomites was discovered

DAY 2

From Rifugio Palmieri to Rifugio Averau- 4.5 hours

From Rifugio Palmieri take trail 434 to Forcella Ambrizzola, then trail 436 to Forcella Giau until Passo Giau. From there trail 443 and then 438 to Nuvolau doing a short Ferrata (Ra Gusela) and then down to Rifugio Averau. Night at Rifugio Averau.

-Possible from Passo Giau to go direcly to Rifugio Averau 

Stunning view points on 5 Torri, Averau and Giau Pass and the whole valley of Cortina from Nuvolau

DAY 3

From Rifugio Averau to Rifugio Lagazuoi- 5 hours

From Averau down to Rifugio Scoiattoli facing the 5 Torri and further down to Bai de Dones, then take the bus up to Passo Falzarego and Ferrata Kaiserjaeger up to Rifugio Lagazuoi. Night at Rifugio Lagazuoi.

-Possible from Averau instead of going to 5 Torri and Bai de Dones and then taking a bus to go around Mount Averau until Col Gallina and walk up to the Falzarego Pass (minus 2 hours)

Rifugio Lagazuoi has an amazing terrace with a panoramic view on the Dolomites; excellent point for sunset and sunrise

DAY 4

From Rifugio Lagazuoi to Rifugio Dibona- 3.5 hours

World War One Via Ferrata Galleria del Lagazuoi to go down, then trail 402 to Rifugio Dibona. Night at Rifugio Dibona.

-Alternative to make it longer is to do the Ferrata Lipella and arrive to the Rifugio Giussani  instead of going directly to the Rifugio Dibona (+2.5 hours), option to arrive at the peak of the Tofana di Rozes (+2 hours)

 Very interesting route through trails and trenches of World War 1. There are many points with descriptions regarding the World War and many panoramic points 

DAY 5

From Rifugio Dibona to Malga Ra Stua - 7 hours

From Rifugio Dibona do the easy Ferrata Astaldi to Rifugio Pomedes, then Trail Olivieri up to Ra Valles, trail 407 and down through the Valon the Ra Ola until Pian de Loa to Malga Ra Stua. Night at Malga Ra Stua.

-From Dibona option to go directly to Pomedes instead of doing the Via Ferrata

 Very panoramic day, amazing view in Ra Valles and Malga Ra Stua is in a very nice location

DAY 6

From Malga Ra Stua to Rifugio Son Forca - 9 hours

From Malga Ra Stua take the shuttle bus to Ospitale and do the Ferrata Ivano Dibona until Rifugio Lorenzi. Go down Forcella Staunies to Rifugio Son Forca. Night at Rifugio Son Forca.

-Possible to take the Ferrata Dibona from the second half to shorten it (minus 1.5 hours)

-Possible not to do the Via Ferrata Ivano Dibona and from Malga Ra Stua walk down to the Tornichè (car park S. Uberto), then take trail 201 until it cross trail 203. Take trail 203 to Rifugio Son Forca (4-5 hours).

Very interesting Ferrata, with a suspended bridge, and stunning view on Cortina and Mount Faloria

DAY 7

From Rifugio Son Forca to Rifugio Vandelli - 3 hours

From Rifugio Son Forca go down along trail 203 to Tre Croci Pass, then take the trail 215 to the Rifugio Vandelli. Night at Rifugio Vandelli.

Next to the Rifugio Vandelli there is the famous Lake Sorapis, famous for its stunning light blue colour

DAY 8

From Rifugio Vandelli to Rifugio San Marco- 8 hours

From Rifugio Vandelli do the Ferrata Vandelli to the Bivacco Comici, then take the trail Minazio (247) until Bivacco Slataper and trail 246 until Rifugio San Marco. Night at Rifugio San Marco.

Route with an amazing view on the Marmarole and Cadini di Misurina

The Bivacco Comici is above the Somadida Forest, a forest with trees of great quality used by the Republic of Venice to build the yardarms of their most prestigious ships

DAY 9                                          

From Rifugio San Marco to Rifugio Tondi - 8 hours

From Rifugio San Marco go back along trail 256 until Bivacco Slataper, and do the Ferrata Berti at Cengia del Banco and follow trail 246 until the crossing with trail 215 towards Faloria, then trail 233 to Rifugio Tondi. Night at Rifugio Tondi.

View on mountains Pelmo, Croda Da Lago, Becco di Mezzodì and town of San Vito di Cadore 

DAY 10

From Rifugio Tondi to Cortina town center - 4 hours

From Rifugio Tondi go down to Rifugio Faloria and then take the Dolomieu Trail (212) to Rio Gere.

From Rio Gere take trail 211 to the Agriturismo Brite de Larieto and keep on the trail until it crosses trail 202 (above the hospital of Cortina) that brings to the pedestrian-bike road that takes to the town center. 

The Trail Dolomieu, a very panoramic route, owes its name to Déodat de Dolomieu, French geologist who in the 18th century first described the carbonate rock dolomite, mineralthat makes up the most typical Dolomite rocks and gives them their typical light color, reason why they are also known as Pale Mountains

UNESCO

UNESCO

The Dolomites are named after French naturalist Déodat de Dolomieu who, in the second half of the eighteenth century, was the first to study the particular type of rock predominant in this region.

The unique mix of minerals present in the rock gives the mountains a special light shade, which is why they are also called the pale mountains. However, at sunset and sunrise the Dolomites are set ablaze by the rays of the sun in a spectacle of colours ranging from pink to fiery red. This is the effect of the famous Enrosadira, or Alpenglow phenomenon.

Two hundred and fifty million years ago, these mountains were a mass of shells, corals and algae, submerged in tropical seas. Emerging 70 million years ago, and eroded by time and weather, today they represent a magnificent geological treasure and give the landscape an incomparable beauty.

Cortina d'Ampezzo, whose mountains are completely inserted in the UNESCO area and under protection of the Natural Park of the Ampezzo Dolomites, is the perfect place to wander and discover this uniquely beautiful world of immense vertical walls, spires and pinnacles, green valleys, high mountain pastures, forests, streams, beautiful lakes, canyons and waterfalls.

THE DOLOMITES

THE DOLOMITES

The Dolomites are named after French naturalist Déodat de Dolomieu who, in the second half of the eighteenth century, was the first to study the particular type of rock predominant in this region.

The unique mix of minerals present in the rock gives the mountains a special light shade, which is why they are also called the pale mountains. However, at sunset and sunrise the Dolomites are set ablaze by the rays of the sun in a spectacle of colours ranging from pink to fiery red. This is the effect of the famous Enrosadira, or Alpenglow phenomenon.

Two hundred and fifty million years ago, these mountains were a mass of shells, corals and algae, submerged in tropical seas. Emerging 70 million years ago, and eroded by time and weather, today they represent a magnificent geological treasure and give the landscape an incomparable beauty.

Cortina d'Ampezzo, whose mountains are completely inserted in the UNESCO area and under protection of the Natural Park of the Ampezzo Dolomites, is the perfect place to wander and discover this uniquely beautiful world of immense vertical walls, spires and pinnacles, green valleys, high mountain pastures, forests, streams, beautiful lakes, canyons and waterfalls.

Natural Park of the Ampezzo Dolomites

THE PROTECTED AREA

THE PROTECTED AREA

The protected area extends north toward the South Tyrolean park of Fanes, Senes and Braies, with which it forms one of the largest naturalis­tic areas in the heart of the Dolomites.

The protected area, which contains no residential settlements or ski facilities, includes the mountain ranges of the Tofana, Fanis, Col Bechei, Croda Rossa d’Ampezzo and Cristallo, divided by the valleys of Travenanzes, Fanes, Alta Valle del Boite and Felizon.

The park contains a wide variety of nat­ural habitats in water and peat bogs, prairies and high altitude forests - some very ancient - and various types of rocky environments. The wide range of habitats, together with the low-level impact of forestry and pastoral areas which characterizes the management of the Regole, give rise to an unusu­ally rich biodiversity

FAUNA

160 species of vertebrate animals live in the park, including 31 species of mam­mals, 113 species of birds and 16 species of amphibians, reptiles and fish.

Some animals are easy to spot, such as marmots (see image), roe deer, deer, ibex, foxes, squirrels and eagles, as well as many small birds and birds of prey.

Other species are more difficult to come across as they hide in woods and in remote areas. These include the capercaillie, the ptarmigan, vari­ous types of owls, and white hares and rodents, such as the ermine and the dormouse.

FLORA

The park also contains a wide variety of plants with 68 species of trees and shrubs, 32 species of ferns and horse­tails, and more than a thousand spe­cies of flowers, including 35 species of orchids and a dozen endemic species exclusive to the Dolomites.

Tourists and botanical enthu­siasts from around the world visit the Dolomites to admire the flowering of the Scarpetta Madonna (Cypripedium calceolus), one of the most beautiful orchids in the European flora (see image).